Progress Monitoring Plan

Progress Monitoring Plan  
Assessment to Practice Alignment:  
Evaluation Results Henry lacks the higher-level thinking abilities to answer grade-level comprehension questions and displays restrained verbal expression due to his inability to decode words from reading material. Henry has received intensive individualized Tier 3 interventions for reading, writing, and spelling but showed little or no progress. During his assessment, Henry told the assessor that he does not like reading but will try his best to improve his reading abilities and welcome feedback from the assessor on his performance. Hence, the student experiences challenges with reading, writing, and spelling but performs well in mathematics.
Present Levels of PerformanceHenry’s present levels of performance showed that his strengths are in math calculation, math fluency, and writing samples where he scored within the average ranges on Woodcock-Johnson Education Assessment. Also, his high average score in the visual-spatial index and fluid reasoning index on the WISC-V Cognitive Battery Assessment showed his strengths. However, Henry is deficient in reading and vocabulary comprehension, including Passage Comprehension, Reading Vocabulary, Writing Fluency, and phonetics of non-sight words, which represent his areas of need.  
Annual GoalsHenry will be able to use letter patterns to decode advanced thirty-six out of forty words and read grade-level difficult words with 90% accuracy by the next reporting period. Also, the student will be able to read a passage from a grade-level book verbally at 133 words per minute with random omissions by the next reporting period (Hedin and DeSpain, 2018).). Lastly, Henry will be able to provide the antonym and synonym of two grade-level vocabulary lists and complete analogies with 90% accuracy by the next reporting period (Hedin et al., 2018).
Data Collection and Management System Alignment  
How will the student’s progress be measured?Goal #1: Henry will be able to use letter patterns to decode advanced thirty-six out of forty words and read grade-level difficult words with 90% accuracy by the next reporting period. The student will improve his score on the Woodcock-Johnston Assessment and his progress will be measured weekly with the Nonsense Word Fluency – Correct Letter Sounds (NWF-CLS) and teacher-developed list of randomly ordered vowel teams (Lara, Pelika, & Wright, 2021).). Goal #2: Henry will be able to read a passage from a grade-level book verbally at 133 words per minute with random omissions by the next reporting period. Henry will improve his score on the Woodcock-Johnston Assessment and his progress will be measured weekly with the easyCBM Passage Reading Fluency (Lara et al., 2021). Goal #3: Henry will be able to provide the antonym and synonym of two grade-level vocabulary lists and complete analogies with 90% accuracy by the next reporting period. The student will improve his score on the Woodcock-Johnston Assessment and his progress will be measured weekly with the Oral Reading Fluency Words Correct (Lara et al., 2021).
How often will progress be measured?Henry’s progress toward the annual goals would be monitored weekly to measure his response to the interventions, including the instructional and assessment methods, and generate data for making relevant changes or improvements to the instructions (Vaccaro and Sabella, 2018).).  
Data collection process: Where and when will assessments occur?The student’s assessment will occur in the classroom either as an individualized or group short test every week that measures fluency and generate scores that correlate with the overall reading comprehension and vocabulary performance for the next reporting period (Vaccaro et al., 2018).  
Who is responsible for collecting and managing this data?The special education teacher would be responsible for collecting the baseline performance data, outcomes of the curriculum-based measurement processes, and the result of the progress monitoring report. The special education teacher will be responsible for managing and storing the data to maintain its integrity and validity for goal review and determination of student’s progress.  
Where will these data be stored?The data will be recorded on the progress monitoring data on a standard computer template and stored on the shared computer drives that are accessible to other members of the IEP team, including the school principal and special education supervisor.
How will these data be communicated to the IEP team? How will it be shared with parents/guardians?The regular communication of the student’s progress with members of the IEP team fosters the collaboration that is required to achieve the expected outcomes. While there are various formats for sharing the information, a visual representation of the performance level with a graph or chart is an appropriate tool for sharing the information with parents/guardians (Wilcox, Fernandez Conde, and Kowbel, 2021).  
How often will these data be shared and communicated with the IEP team?The frequency of data sharing should depend on the agreed reporting period at the start of the session. However, the monthly distribution of the data to other members of the IEP ensures effective shared decisions regarding the student’s progress toward the expected performance levels (Wilcox et al., 2021).
How will you use these data to drive your instructional practices?The performance level data and progress monitoring report for the student would determine the continuous use of the instructional methods or influence changes when Henry’s performance is below the expected levels (Wilcox et al.,2021). Overall, the progress and general outcome measurement data would determine the effectiveness of the instructional practices in developing the reading comprehension and reading vocabulary competencies that students need to achieve grade-level requirements.

References

Hedin, L., & DeSpain, S. (2018). SMART or not? Writing specific, measurable IEP goals. Teaching Exceptional Children51(2), 100-110. DOI:10.1177/0040059918802587

Lara, J., Pelika, S., & Wright, J. (2021). Struggling Readers. NEA Research Brief. NBI No. 31 (2018). National Education Association, 1-12. https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED616227.pdf

Vaccaro, D. T., & Sabella, L. D. (2018). Impact on student learning: Monitoring student progress. Journal of Practitioner Research3(1), 5. https://doi.org/10.5038/2379-9951.3.1.1070

Wilcox, G., Fernandez Conde, C., & Kowbel, A. (2021). Using evidence-based practice and data-based decision making in inclusive education. Education Sciences11(3), 129. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11030129

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