Advanced Study of Diversity and Curriculum

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Advanced Study of Diversity and Curriculum EDCS820-J61-FALL-2022 0Discussion Board Forum: Weeks One and Two: Fractured Identities in Diverse Classrooms

Thread: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman, Garyn Gabriel, Sid Johnson

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  TODD Lilly0  0posted 1 month ago (last edited 16 days ago)
  
  Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman, Garyn
  Gabriel, Sid Johnson 
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JENNIFER Augustine0                                                                                1 month ago

RE: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman, Sid Johnson

When I began reading the text for this week, I was struck by how some of the ideas I encountered mirrored some of the things that my yoga teacher, Anthony, says often. I found it helpful for myself to organize my reflection by commenting on these various similarities.

One of the things that Anthony likes to say often is that we’ve gotten it wrong by saying “I think therefore I am.” One of Anthony’s beliefs is that thoughts are secondary to being and that they are merely a tool for us to use rather than a definition of who we are as people. I somewhat agree with this. I have been in the practice of trying to use my thoughts as a tool and not let them control me for some time now, but I think this relates beautifully to the aim of this class. We are here to learn, discuss, and grow together. We are not our thoughts. Our thoughts are really just a reflection of who we are at a certain point in time. As humans, we have the ability to change who we are as people and therefore change our thoughts. Especially in environments like this class, we can truly use our thoughts as a tool to critically examine ourselves, others, and practices, in order to decide who we are and who we want to be. This idea also came though in the missive

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11/30/22, 12:02 PM                                                             Thread: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin …

for this week when the idea of a changing identity was brought up. It is too simple to think that someone’s identity is static, especially as people work to learn new things and strive to become different (hopefully better) versions of themselves. As stated in the text for this week, “The ‘I’ that existed yesterday and the series of I’s that exist at every point of its history are only connected by the story the present ‘I’ recites, recreates, and revises in order to make sense of the present condition (15). When thought of this way, our identities are an ever-changing story that we are simultaneously in control of authoring and at the mercy of outside forces that shape who we are. It’s kind of exciting and liberating to think about it in that way.

Another “light bulb” moment for me happened when I read the analysis of the Walt Kelly comic on the first and second page of our reading for this week. This analysis revealed how grammatically speaking, there was no separation between “we,” “he,” “enemy,” and “us.” Anthony tells his students all the time that our bodies are an illusory line of separation. We are separate from nothing and a part of everything. Even thinking about the idea of ourselves and an “enemy,” where does that distinction lie? Is someone our enemy because they are different from us or have an identity that doesn’t match ours? And if that is the case, aren’t we then, by default, their enemy? If we are both classified as an “enemy,” are we then united in that identity? I appreciate that we are starting this course by considering identities, because I have also come to believe that our identities cannot be separate from anything. Our identities and who we are are shaped by so many factors outside of ourselves, that thinking we are completely separate from other people seems silly.

It is also clear that we cannot create a separate distinction between the various fragments of our identities. The text for this week mentions both Jekyll and Hyde and Frankenstein as literary embodiments of the fracturedidentity. In both texts, the protagonists have an alter ego of sorts, who is meant to reflect the “monstrous” side of the character. Despite the fact that these “monsters” are presented as being separate, both authors force the reader to observe that they are actually one in the same. It can be comforting for us to conceptualize our less desirable portions of our identities as separate from us, but doing so is in effect lying to ourselves about who we truly are.

When exploring human perception of identity and struggle to define it, the reading for this week references a line from Shakespeare’s Hamlet: “For there is nothing either good or bad but thinking makes it so” (II.ii.232-3). Often, in the middle of an excruciatingly hot yoga class, Anthony will remind his students that there is no such thing as “good” or “bad,” but rather we are the ones that attribute judgment to things. Instead of thinking about how horribly oppressive the heat of the room can be (sometimes upwards of 108 degrees), it is simply “hot.” Especially as we think critically about our own identities, I think this is a helpful reminder. The things that make us who we are are neither good or bad, they simply are. Having this perspective will also allow us to more honestly reflect on our identities, rather than shying away from or denying things that we have decided are “bad.”

To circle all of this back to my position as a classroom teacher, I was struck by the realization that if figuring my own identity out is so complicated, it would be completely incorrect of me to simplify my students’ identities and pretend as if I have anything close to a complete understanding of everything that makes each student who they are. Their identities flux just as mine depending on where they are, who they are around, and how they are in relationship with the world around them at that moment. Additionally, I feel that I have a responsibility as a teacher, and specifically as an English teacher, to help students become more aware of their identities and also to give them the space and resources to take some control over their identities. Virtue (2019) discusses how identity creation happens in a space where students can connect to the material in a classroom and are given time to independently process this material. I am

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11/30/22, 12:02 PM                                                             Thread: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin …

obviously biased, but I think that an English classroom is the perfect place to help students wrestle with their identities as they explore the stories and ideas of others. In this light, it is more crucial than ever to select texts in which students can see a reflection of their own identities, but also expose them to different stories and different perspectives.

Virtue, E. E. (2019). Using Fiction to Support Identity Development and Transition in Conditionally-Enrolled Students. Journal of Effective Teaching, 2(2), 70–84.

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JENNIFER Augustine0            1 month ago

RE: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman, Sid Johnson

About me!

I forgot to include a bit of information about myself.

I am an 8th-grade English teacher. I started out teaching high school in Lexington, SC. My husband and I relocated to Rochester, MN, where there were only middle school English jobs open. It’s been a pretty fun experience and I’ve definitely learned a lot. I am on the last leg of my Ed.D in Educational Practice & Innovation. I am potentially looking to move into an instructional design career.

Outside of work and school, I love hiking, working out, hanging out with my dogs, and going to concerts. I am a big food person. Especially living where it is below freezing for the majority of the year, eating food and going to breweries are a large source of entertainment.

I am looking forward to meeting/getting to know you all better!

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TODD Lilly0  01 month ago

RE: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman, Sid Johnson

Hello Jennifer. As I read your response(s) to this week’s text, I honestly thougth: “Maybe Jennifer should be teaching this class,” but then realized you already are. I hope your group responds to things you brought to light. I hope to return to this group several times over the next 10 days as we think more about our and our students’ identities, what cultural factors influence those identities, and how much agency we really have to mold those identities.

BTW: Rochester, MN is named after my hometown of Rochester, NY. The Mayo Clinic was very influential in my daughters undergrad work at Viterbo University as a nursing student. Even with our dreadfully hot, humid summers, my wife and I are perfectly content not to shiver through week after week of sub zero temps as we did up in Wisconsin. We can always visit in the summer, and we do.

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Patrice Barrett0             1 month ago

RE: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman, Sid Johnson

I love how you took the reading and tied it to something relative to you. I hope after implementing close reading strategies, my students will begin to do this naturally. I love that you mention reflection of the self in that moment. When the moment passes.. it becomes the past.

I love your exploration of the monsters in the text. When I thought of this example, I agree with the authors at some point our inner selves does face a conflict . As you stated to separate one side from the other,, would be a lie. While the identify is fractured is all still connected as one rather tightly woven or loosely connected.

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JENNIFER Augustine0            1 month ago

RE: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman, Sid Johnson

Patrice,

Something that I think is super important is getting students to connect what they are reading and learning to their own lives. It’s funny that you brought that up in your response to my post, because I am currently in a discussion-based unit with my students, and before every discussion, I stress to them that they should be talking about their own experiences and opinions in the discussions. Strangely enough, I find that students are wired to only talk about the reading. It seems like they think their personal experiences are not a valid thing to bring into the conversation. By making connections between personal experience and readings more concrete and obvious, maybe we can get students to realize the importance of doing this!

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Patrice Barrett0             1 month ago

RE: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman, Sid Johnson

Yes, as teachers that is our goal. “Good readers naturally associate text events based off of their experiences’ have never thought about having a discussion based unit with my students. Being able to discuss content, or text is a really important skill. I’m glad your students are willing giving their opinion as it relates to your class, my students are struggling to critique the strategies we use and make the connection that close reading can be done outside of my class. But I do love helping students have that aha moment about

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a text when it comes to connecting it to their personal lives. Maybe these skills will be automatic by January.

TODD Lilly00             1 month ago

RE: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman, Sid Johnson

Patrice and Jennifer: I totally agree that true literacy events require the participant to contextualize the ideas of the text within his/her own world. I am not a David Coleman disciple, not at all, but I do concede that what often happens in a classroom is that readers go off on their own stories and leave the text. In this class, I charge you to go off into your own worlds but keep one foot on the text at the same time. When we illustrate the text with our own illustrations, it’s important to cite the text, including the page # if possible. It’s a skill I’m sure you have perfected in writing your dissertation. Good teachers are ones that constantly redirect the students back to the lesson objective/ the text at hand.

Sid Johnson0                1 month ago

RE: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman, Sid Johnson

Jennifer,

I agree that figuring my own identity out is so complicated. I agree that it would be completely incorrect of us as educators to simplify students’ identities and pretend as if I have anything close to a complete understanding of everything that makes each student who they are. I reflect on how often we take this stance in education and pretend that we know, when in actuality we do not. Reading this week’s text caused me to reflect on my own identity and how other’s would identify me.

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JENNIFER Augustine0            1 month ago

RE: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman, Sid Johnson

I totally agree with you that examining our own identities is really important. I remember from another diversity course that I took a question that was posed in one of the readings: Do the students that are unlike you succeed at the same rate of students who are like you? As humans, we naturally structure our classrooms and interactions with others in the way that aligns

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with our own identities, so being able to recognize this and examine ourselves should better set us up to reach the individuals whose identities are very different from our own.

Kevin Brent Forman0 1 month ago

RE: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman, Sid Johnson

Hi Jenna,

I think the English classroom is the perfect place to wrestle with identity, and how it is constructed! In our first course in DEI, we examined how standards of English knowledge were based on mainstream norms. The problem occurs when others are deemed “less than” when compared against these dominant norms But if we were to use language structures and vernacular of marginized groups as new standards, then the mainstream ideas about “passing” standards would reversed. I guess what I am trying to say is that as educators , we need to be always cognizant of not marginilazing others, and going above and beyond to make our course content accessible by all of our learners.

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JENNIFER Augustine0            1 month ago

RE: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman, Sid Johnson

Kevin,

I am glad you brought up the way in which language “correctness” is often almost weaponized against populations that have different language structures. I remember when I was first confronted with this idea in grad school, and I had a conversation with my husband about it. He could not (and still cannot) wrap his head around the idea that anything other than Standard English would be acceptable in school. I think the problem that we are always faced with is efficiency. I think many people could be persuaded that more than one language system is valid. However, many of these people would then question what happens in higher education institutions? What happens in the work place? Our society is set up to be singular because that is what is easy.

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Kevin Brent Forman01 month ago
RE: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin
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11/30/22, 12:02 PMThread: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin …

JENNIFER Augustine0            1 month ago

RE: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman, Sid Johnson

  Kevin Brent Forman0 1 month ago
  RE: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman, Sid
  Johnson   
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  TODD Lilly0  0 1 month ago

RE: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman, Sid Johnson

JENNIFER Augustine0                                                                          1 month ago

RE: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman, Sid Johnson

  Sid Johnson0 1 month ago
  RE: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman, Sid
  Johnson   
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  Patrice Barrett0 1 month ago

RE: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman, Sid Johnson

JENNIFER Augustine01 month ago
RE: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman,
Sid Johnson 
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Kevin Brent Forman0 1 month ago

RE: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman, Sid Johnson

Patrice Barrett0             1 month ago

RE: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman, Sid Johnson

Personal Introduction

Hello, I would like to introduce myself to my groupmates and others in the class. My name is Patrice. I am a reading intervention teacher. I have been a full-time teacher since August 2015. I have a dog named Gucci (he was born in 2009). My research interest is evaluating reading strategies in a virtual environment with struggling fifth grade boys. The Covid 19 pandemic has severely increased the need for successfully teaching instruction through online tools and modules. My interest in pursing my doctoral degree heavily relies on what is effective instruction and how can I combine that with my background in reading and language. This semester I

am implementing my intervention with 12 students who scored on a 4th grade reading level or below. Next semester I will analyze my data and the semester after that I plan to defend. I am truly excited about sharing my research when I have the opportunity. My future goals are to help schools decide which technology programs should be implemented in their school and teach and teach future teachers at the collegiate level. So if your or your institution is hiring please contact me.

While, I am a reading teacher first, and a student second, I definitely

found the paper to be a challenging read. I have reviewed it over the course of several days, with highlighting and making comments, and trying to get a background on some of the phrases. My intervention is actually based on 4 close reading strategies with my students using nonfiction and fictional text. I agree with some respect that our sense “of reality is shaped artificially”

(3). To some degree our reality is the impact of so many things that occurred before we got here or arrived to adulthood. I think we experience the domino effects of the shadows of those events, from laws to historical events. I think the proposed question “How do I know that I am? How do I know what is” (3) is worth exploring. How do we measure the I? Which is what I think this paper is exploring. How do I know what’s what. I think about the analogy given with the airplane and its existence is only in the here and now. Ten minutes after it leaves a certain space in time, it is no longer that plane. That plane ceases to exist it has moved on. But I think that’s one lens. If I’m here now, is the old me somewhere still experiencing something at a slower rate? How much of our past impacts who were are now?

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As Dr. Lilly “admires Paige’s rage against the machine” (13). I wonder in this aspect does this mean the machine of which people refer to as k-12 public education that we are driving America’s children to be products of a factory. I see a bit of alignment between the machine comment and factory production theory of K-12 public education. This is a very broad comment, I actually do not have a source to compare this with, it’s just American education is spoken so negatively about I’m wondering is Paige fighting against being cattle and her own induvial person. Because the events trickle down and impact generations and global concerns I support the theory that war changes reality, and that victims cannot afford to be ignorant to the world around them (16). For example, the war on woman in Iran, the war in Ethiopia, and the war in Ukraine (New York Times https://www.nytimes.com/2022/10/08/world/africa/ethiopia-tigray-war-talks-us.html). The citizens are widely aware of the state of their country, although news media outlets try to sensor how much information get shared to different continents. Their life or death truly depends on them not being ignorant.

WHO am I?

I like the idea that consciousness can only be present of itself in the moment (15). To me this perspective means, I am the sum its memories separated and connected by time in the same breath. When I think of the fractured self of I. Imagine an enlarged letter I on a wall painted in the pointillism fashion (https://www.artmajeur.com/en/magazine/5-art-history/pointillism-in-contemporary-artistic-language/332077). This large I is made of many dots or specs of color. I see this as the fractured self. For instance, my letter I was on a wall, I would like to think I am in control , I am who I wanted to be but I think that would be false. Some of those dots would represent historical events, or family events to lead to my birth. This could be as detailed as my mother’s understanding about what it takes to have a successful pregnancy in the 90’s and the fact that she did have a successful pregnancy. Some of the dots would represent experiences of my mother and father which would shape my own experiences and contribute to my perspective of the world. What about my teachers? Could their experiences have bleed into the way they teach or encouraged me as a student? I became a teacher, there has to be some sort of ripple effect for my career choice to mimic adults I spent the most time with outside of my childhood home? At some point in the essay societal influences are discussed? So in this example of I believe a “series of frames” or events, then my example is a series of collected event or memories that lead to shaping my environment.

I could easily assume people see me as a teacher, one who is always trying to drag parents online for reading workshops. I see myself as a lot of things and it depends on the frame of mind I could be in or it could dependent on my environment in that moment. I think I spend most of my time as a student and a teacher and it hard to turn those identities off. I was talking to a new friend outside of work about adult topics, and they kept asking why am I censoring my language, and I said because I spend 40 hours a week talking around children. As it relates to identity, I was looking at some family shirts and the title would be the cousin who.. and I almost said the cousin who teaches and writes. But is that all I am? I was actually puzzled to just give my self a one word identity outside of my job? Could I choose a positive phrase that represents me that does not relate to academics

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and my career? Am I more than a granddaughter, a care giver, a citizen. The

fractured self can cause conflicts at times. Who am I in the moment depends on what needs to be done, but that’s the environment being in control, that is not my self being in charge. Much how the unskilled master was dependent on the skilled servant, my identity is dependent on what my environment demands from me.. essentially and I just can’t escape it .. the teacher.

POP:

It’s important to understand my own identity as I implement my intervention with my fifth-grade students. As I spend 3 sessions a week with each group of gentlemen, I am learning more about them as individuals and what they respond to as it relates to a classroom environment. What is the identify of my students? I can assume they see themselves as African American boys. A few of them have stated they are not good at reading or they don’t like to read. From a first glance, their banter amongst each other gives off they have tough exteriors, but as I really want my research do this marinized group justice, I’m hoping to expose those layers, and learned what shaped them as readers. The general research on African American boys, in my perspective portrays them as unmotivated and many other negative lenses. I’m hoping with my surveys and interviews, that I can shed light on their personal ideas about learning and reading and their future relationships with reading. At this point, sometimes the surveys are a little difficult , because asking the students their opinion on their education is probably extremely new for them however, if I want to be apart of social change, it has to start somewhere.

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JENNIFER Augustine0            1 month ago

RE: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman, Sid Johnson

Kevin Brent Forman0 1 month ago

RE: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman, Sid Johnson

Hi Patrice,

Thanks for bringing it all back to your problem of practice. I admire and respect your committment to social justice and social chance and how your research is a part of your committment to diversity, equity and inclusion! I know we are all doing our part to improve the educational landscape in our respective contexts, and I look forward to hearning more abut how your data collection is coming along! Your identity as the “expert” in your field- and I say “expert” because to your studnets, you are. You are a professional and this identity affects your participants, no doubt. It’s good you are aware of this lens, or filter, and bu unclusing the perspectives of your research subjects (your students) you are tring to reduce these barriers, or if that can’t be done, acknowedge this identity

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in your own dissertation writing. Doing this acknowledges that as the rresearcher, you are cognizant of various biases that play into your study.

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Patrice Barrett0             1 month ago

RE: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman, Sid Johnson

Oh yes, we will have to catch about that over break. Right, and because of my expert role, I think this does infuence many aspects with my researcher. But I do feel I am closer to the students since I am not an outsider as it related to being employed by the school. You are absolutely correct about the biases I possess as I am different from my students by age, gender, life status, fnancial status, and the power dynamic I posses as their teacher. I hope their perspectives through the interview are able to shed light on them in a positive way and reduce my own barriers as it relates to my role as the researcher.

Kevin Brent Forman0 1 month ago

RE: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman, Sid Johnson

Good evening classmates!

As I read through this weeks, reading, I was, at first, a bit dumbstruck by the idea of integrating diversity, equity and inclusion concepts with our Greek philosopher Plato, through the Middle Ages (the rise of Christian era) and into the Renaissance. Having taught this Art History timeline for so many years, I am very familiar with the lack of diversity, equity and inclusion in these eras, and wondered how this would integrate with this class? It’s hard to celebrate diversity, equity and inclusion in these eras that are so closely aligned with patriarchal notions of supremacy (Ancient Greek women were not citizens and couldn’t vote-only Athenian born, white males could vote), and one thousand years of spreading Christianity throughout Europe and eradication other forms of religion. This is a far cry from diversity, equity and inclusion as we will discuss in this course, I hope. Don’t get me wrong classmates, I am a lover of the Humanities and can simultaneously celebrate the accomplishments that were made during these eras and point out the origins of chauvinism, and other seriously deficient ideas about identity and personhood. It is just that I found it difficult to find the connections to diversity, equity and inclusion, at first.

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So I was relieved when the essay mentioned Paolo Freire and his book Pedagogy of the Oppressed, since I was first introduced to it during my graduate program with a linguistics / teaching / English emphasis decades ago. In fact, the ideas Freire discusses, specifically, the “banking” concept of education, could be used to justify the importance of diversity, equity and inclusion in today’s classrooms. I am afraid I could start writing a thesis at this point, but I know this is just supposed to be a reaction to what resonates with me so I will do my best to stick to that. Specifically, I can easily connect Paolo Freire and Art History’s lack of instructional strategies that speak to diversity, equity and inclusion. I taught Art History for 15 years and have thought a great deal about the democratizing, problem-posing, critical pedagogy, people empowering Freire!

Specifically related to Art History, despite decades of research that shows the importance and effectiveness of active learning, lecturing still remains a signature practice for Art History instruction. I am certainly not the first Art History instructor to question the effectiveness of a lecture-based approach to delivering course content, and pointing out that this instructional strategy is narrow and short sighted when trying to reach a diverse group of learners. Art Historian Jonathan Kinkley, in his article Art Thief: An educational computer game model for Art Historical instruction, cites researchconducted by the National Training Board showing that lecturing produced the lowest retention rate amongst learners.

Another Art History professor Robert Bersson also questions why professors are so committed to the lecture method given the fact that research shows lecturing doesn’t improve retention of course content. Learners should be active participant in their learning process, and should be viewed as “active constructors”, he points out in Jonathan Kinkley’s article, Art Thief: An educational computer game model for Art Historical instruction. The problem with thelecture method is that it views students as passive recipients of knowledge, or, as Paolo Freire phrases it in his book Pedagogy of the Oppressed, “containers” who need to be filled with knowledge(Freire, 1994). In his “banking concept of education” (p. 53), Freire describes the role of the teacher as one who knows everything, and assumes the students know nothing, and that the only way for the students to gain knowledge is for the teacher to “deposit” knowledge into “receptacles” waiting to be filled. (p.53). This model of teaching describes the standard lecture approach typically used in Art History instruction. Bersson posits the reason the lecture method of delivery in Art History classrooms has dominated the field is because Art History professors are generally not taught how to teach, and universities prioritize publishing over pedagogy. He advocates for a comprehensive redesign of Art History curricula to include small group discussions, museum visits, critical thinking exercises, and interactive technologies.

All learners benefit from instructional design that includes active learning, but todays multilingual, multiracial, and multigenerational learners are poised to benefit the most. A flipped classroom allows the teacher to connect directly with the students in

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extended, meaningful discussions because it encourages discovery, reflection and application during classroom time, and allows students the opportunities to practice critical thinking, contextual analysis, and stylistic description and analysis with their classmates and instructor. In a lecture oriented classroom, lectures tend to stress lower-order skills described on Bloom’s Taxonomy, such as remembering or understanding (Bloom, 1956). In a classroom that allows for application and transfer of knowledge, however, higher order critical thinking skills are emphasized. By creating collaborative projects (based in constructivist learning theory) that require students to analyze and evaluate information shared during lecture, students become active in their learning process, and the teacher witnesses learning in action. Engaging in extended dialogue with course content is crucial for students to create new meaning, and learn content at deeper levels. By inviting students to draw upon their experience, and by allowing them to share their process with one another, a flipped instructional strategy embraces the diversity of learning experiences so all student can contribute. This also aligns with Freire’s democratizing notions of empowering learners and rejecting the “banking” concept of education that traditional Art History instruction relies on.

Since today’s Higher education landscape is more diverse
than ever before, integrating a flipped, project-based approach
involves students and students learn to make decisions about what
steps are needed to meet a learning goal, thereby developing skills of
inquiry and learning time-management skills. They become active
participants in their learning process, and this is a critical difference
compared to lecture – dominated classes that don’t include the
student in the negotiation of meaning. As a result, students have
more control over their learning, and instructors are more likely to see
engaged learners, something that is usually rare in the traditional Art
History classroom. 
Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy. (n.d.). Retrieved October 23, 2022, from
http://www.celt.iastate.edu/teaching/effective-teaching- 
practices/revised-blooms-taxonomy/ 
Freire, P. (1994). Pedagogy of the oppressed. New York: Continuum.
Kinkley, J. (2009). Art Thief: An Educational Computer Game Model
for Art Historical Instruction. Leonardo, 42(2), 133-110. Retrieved
from http://0-www.jstor.org.library.academyart.edu/stable/20532619
Weiman, C. (2018, December 14). Professors Share: The Moment
That Changed the Way I Teach. The Chronicle of Higher Education,
pp. A8-A10. 
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JENNIFER Augustine01 month ago
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11/30/22, 12:02 PM                                                             Thread: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin …

RE: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin Forman, Sid Johnson

Kevin,

I think you had a very insightful post, but I want to respond specifically to your discussion of using philosophy from Ancient Greek and Renaissance thinkers to think about inclusion and diversity. I didn’t even think of it when I completed the reading, but I totally agree with you that this seems kind of absurd considering that diversity and inclusion were in rough shape during these eras. At the same time, I think there were some really influential ideas and thoughts that came out of these time periods that are very useful even today. This tension between thought and reality is really no different than our own time. There is an abundance of great scholarship and philosophy, but by no means does it follow that our social and political climate is in line with this scholarship and philosophy. This is somewhat of a silly connection, but I also work for Lululemon, and they have termed their commitment to inclusion IDEA, which stands for Inclusion, Diversity, Equity, and Action. To me, the addition of action is the piece that is often missing in society. It is one thing to talk about being more inclusive, but it is quite another to actually act on this and practice it. I wonder when the bridge will be effectively built between thought and action in society.

Patrice Barrett0             1 month ago

Week 2

My problem of practice came through my observations over the years. As we examine our identities as researchers, and the identity of our students and look further into the specific lenses, that we will use, environment played a key role in the selection of my problem of practice. As a person who has worked in 4 school districts, I kept wondering why there seemed to be a consistent trend of African American boys always making up the highest percent of struggling readers with urban and rural settings (Wood & Jocius, 2013). As we took multiple choruses in this program and I began to understand what action research is, I decided I wanted to and could make a difference in my environment or sphere of influence. According to (Vaughn et al., 2014) action research should be used as a reflective teaching tool. If I conducted this dream intervention, what would I gleam from it? What would the participants gain or even my small hometown community seek to benefit from this research? I began to have glimmer of hope that I could shed light on this terrible trend in different schools, and release this population from being seeing with a deficit (Bean-Folkes & Ellison, 2018) lens by working through various frameworks.

Interpretive frame works are the philosophical ideals. There are two frames that should be explored: social science and social justice theories. My research falls under the social justice theory (7) seeking to address a social issue or attempt at advocacy for marginalized citizens. My action research explores the historical trend of black boys and low reading scores. It also

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11/30/22, 12:02 PM                                                             Thread: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin …

unravels the perspective portrayed on the students in a deficit framework of

thinking. Due to factors like consistent under performing schools, phenomenon’s like the prison to pipeline theory (Scott, 2017), and a 5 decade trend of terrible reading scores for this population, I consider my study to fall under social justice theory. How does my action research seek to bring about change? The first concept as it relates to my students is that I give my student’s a voice. During this reading intervention, I am gaining the students opinion on their experience with the reading strategies through the use of flip grid. We are also attempting to investigate student motivation. At the end of this 12 week intervention the students will participate in a focus group. I want my research to highlight the need for student decision making and student opinions as it relates to curriculum that strengthens our students instead of the opposite factor. I hope my student leads to student growth and maybe some glowing up as it relates to thinking and reading.

I believe my action research aligns with the social constructivism worldview in one aspect (9). One of my goals of my research is to give my students the opportunity to participate in the research and not just have the research happen for them. It was important that each week students share their thoughts and most important during the focus group as well . “The goal of the research, then is to rely as much as possible on the participants views”. While the entire intervention may not rest on their views, their opinions and suggestions will play a large role in the view painted of them as individuals and not as marginalized group. Many of the focus group questions are open ended to gain insight and understanding of the student perspective.

I enjoyed reading about the transformative framework again. According to the text, this type of action research calls for social change, empowers the individual is done with the students not to them (10). The agenda behind this particular action research is to hopefully spark a change within my sphere of influence. I believe by gaining insight from the students, we can begin to learn what strategies they prefer compared to the others. According to several studies, African American boys are generally described with a deficit frame work and the articles often lack the perspective of the participants (10).

The text reiterates that transformative framework studies seek to conduct research with the participants in comparison to the study being “done to them”(10). I wanted to provided my students from a rural area with a voice. My chair and I have agreed to use specific statements from the students when I present my research. We feel this is important in upholding the transformative framework. We expect for my audience to be my peers, my administers, my local school board and hopefully a statewide conference .

References

Bean-Folkes, J., & Ellison, T. L. (2018). Teaching in a culture of love: An open dialogue about African American student learning. School

Community Journal, 28(2), 213–228.

Scott, D. (2017). Developing the Prison-to-School Pipeline: A Paradigmatic

Shift in Educational Possibilities during an Age of Mass Incarceration.

Journal of Correctional Education, 68(3), 41–52.

Sharma, A. (2022). Other Interpretive Frameworks. Mandala Urbanism, Landscape, and Ecology, 27–34. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-87285-4_3

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11/30/22, 12:02 PM                                                             Thread: Group Two: Jennifer Augustine, Patrice Barrett, Kevin …

Vaughn, M., Parsons, S. A., Kologi, S., & Saul, M. (2014). Action research as a reflective tool: a multiple case study of eight rural educators’ understandings of instructional practice. Reflective Practice, 15(5), 634–650. https://doi.org/10.1080/14623943.2014.900030

Wood, S., & Jocius, R. (2013). Combating “i hate this stupid book!”: Black males and critical literacy. Reading Teacher, 66(8), 661–669. https://doi.org/10.1002/TRTR.1177

I mixed up the deadlines.. Hopefully it won’t hurt or confuse anything to post this now. My apologies in advance .

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